Press Releases

Fraunhofer IWS

Key component for batteries of the future

3.4.2019

© Fraunhofer IWS

Fraunhofer IWS scientists headed by Dr. Holger Althues have developed an innovative process for the cost-efficient production of thin lithium anodes made of molten lithium. In the BMBF-funded “MaLiBa” project, the Dresden Institute is working with the companies hpulcas and SGS as well as with scientists led by Prof. Dr. Jürgen Janek of the Justus Liebig University in Giessen to solve further crucial issues relating to this concept. The most important innovation consists in realizing an anode compound. This contains a few micrometers thick nickel foil with lithium film stabilized by means of protective layers.

For more information, please visit the IWS website.
Key component for batteries of the future

Fraunhofer ILT

Laser technology supports the path to printed electronic diversity

27.3.2019

© Fraunhofer ILT

In recent years, the demands placed on component-integrated electronics have risen so sharply in many industries that they can often no longer be met with conventional electronic components. As an alternative, printed electronics is on the advance. At the Hanover Fair from April 1 to 5, 2019, experts from the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, Germany, will be demonstrating the role lasers play in this process. Highlights include the directly printed strain gauge sensor, the locally gold-plated contacts and the electrically conductive glass fiber fabric.

For more information, please visit the ILT website.
Laser technology supports the path to printed electronic diversity

Fraunhofer ILT

12,000 holes per second with 1 µm diameter

13.3.2019

© Fraunhofer ILT

A new generation of ultrafast process technology is on the market. Higher average laser power and greater pulse energy promise higher throughput and efficiency. When processing microfilters, for example, this makes it possible to drill hole sizes down to below one micrometer much more quickly. When scaling the processes, there are some non-trivial interaction mechanisms to contend with, which were one of the topics of the “5th UKP-Workshop: Ultrafast Laser Technology„ in Aachen.

For more information, please visit the ILT website.
12,000 holes per second with 1 µm diameter

Fraunhofer IPT

Light and strong: Hybrid lightweight components made of steel and fiber-reinforced plastics

8.3.2019

© Fraunhofer IPT

In recent years there has been a sharp increase in demand for lighter components for applications in mobility and transport in response to the need to save weight, and therefore energy and resources. Hybrid components made of steel, locally functionalized with fiber-reinforced plastics combine high mechanical performance with low weight. Demand for manufacturing processes conducive to cost-effective mass-production is burgeoning. In the EU research project “ComMUnion”, the two Aachen-based Fraunhofer Institutes for Production Technology IPT and for Laser Technology ILT, in collaboration with 14 partners from industry, research and academia, are developing industrial processes and solutions for hybrid lightweight design by combining metal and polymer-matrix composites for automotive and aerospace applications.

For more information, please visit the ILT website.
Light and strong: Hybrid lightweight components made of steel and fiber-reinforced plastics

Fraunhofer IWS

Economical engines due to less friction

4.3.2019

© Fraunhofer IWS

Together with the automotive industry, researchers at the Fraunhofer IWS have been working to develop processes for friction-reducing surfaces of engine components over the past few years. Now, carbon dioxide emissions can be reduced even further by enhancing surface technology. The Dresden Institute is researching in this direction with various partners in the joint project "Prometheus".

For more information, please visit the IWS website.
Economical engines due to less friction

Fraunhofer ILT

Laser Processes for Multi-Functional Composites

18.2.2019

© Fraunhofer ILT

Since composites combine the advantages of dissimilar materials, they can be used to exploit great potential in lightweight construction. At JEC World 2019 in Paris in March, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will present a broad range of laser-based technologies for the efficient production and processing of composite materials. Visitors to the joint booth of the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Construction AZL, Hall 5A/D17, will gain insight into joining and cutting processes as well as surface structuring.

For more information, please visit the ILT website
Laser Processes for Multi-Functional Composites

Fraunhofer ICT

Directly-cooled electric motor made from polymer materials

1.2.2019

© Fraunhofer ICT

Making electric cars lighter also involves reducing the weight of the motor. One way to do that is by constructing it from fiber-reinforced polymer materials. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT are working together with the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT to develop a new cooling concept that will enable polymers to be used as motor housing materials. And that’s not the only advantage of the new cooling concept: it also significantly increases the power density and efficiency of the motor compared to the state of the art.

For more information, please visit the ICT website.
Directly-cooled electric motor made from polymer materials

Fraunhofer ILT

Producing polymer structures faster – two processes in one machine

6.2.2019

© Fraunhofer ILT

Either fast or precise – both cannot be achieved in the production of the finest polymer structures with the laser. Or maybe they can? Combining stereolithography and multiphoton polymerization should make it possible: Scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT are developing a machine for high-precision, cost-effective 3D construction technologies using both methods. On November 1, 2018, Fraunhofer ILT and its project partners launched the project “High Productivity and Detail in Additive Manufacturing through the Combination of UV Polymerization and Multi-Photon Polymerization – HoPro-3D”, which is funded by the European Union and the state of North Rhine-Westphalia.

For more information, please visit the ILT website

Producing polymer structures faster – two processes in one machine

Fraunhofer ILT

Making ultrafast lasers faster

31.1.2019

© Fraunhofer ILT

Lasers with ultrashort pulses in the picosecond and femtosecond range are often referred to as ultrafast lasers. They are known for their ultra-precise ablation and cutting results. Unfortunately, processing with such lasers takes time. To address this issue, a new research project, funded by the European Commission, aims to make material processing with ultrafast lasers up to a hundred times faster.

For more information, please visit the ILT website

Making ultrafast lasers faster

Fraunhofer IWS

Joining gun bonds metal and plastic within seconds

24.1.2019

© Fraunhofer IWS

Scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS in Dresden have developed a joining gun that creates a connection between metal and thermoplastic materials within seconds. This gun is of a modular design and can easily be integrated into the production process, for example by mounting on a robot arm in place of a spot welding gun. At the preview leading up to the Hanover Trade Fair on January 24, 2019 on the trade fair grounds in Hall 19, scientist Annett Klotzbach will be demonstrating the advantages of the joining gun.

For more information, please visit the IWS website.
Joining gun bonds metal and plastic within seconds

Fraunhofer IWS, Fraunhofer IWM

Elucidating the Atomic Mechanism of Superlubricity

11.1.2019

© Fraunhofer IWM

The phenomenon of so-called superlubricity is known, but so far the explanation at the atomic level has been missing: for example, how does extremely low friction occur in bearings? Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institutes IWM and IWS jointly deciphered a universal mechanism of superlubricity for certain diamond-like carbon layers in combination with organic lubricants. Based on this knowledge, it is now possible to formulate design rules for supra lubricating layer-lubricant combinations. The results are presented in an article in Nature Communications, volume 10.

For more information, please visit the IWS website

Elucidating the Atomic Mechanism of Superlubricity